Browsing: Cells to Society

Cells to Society
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“Night shift work has historically been associated with circadian rhythm changes, health risks, and even emotional effects.” It also, apparently, can lead to more nursing errors, according to “Is There a Relationship Between Night Shift and Errors? What Nurse Leaders Need to Know,” a review of literature by Assistant Professor Vickie Hughes, DNS, MSN, RN.
Cells to Society
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The United States has long been a magnet for immigrants seeking employment and a better, safer life, despite the challenges and stress that are often part of the transition. But the longer they are here, the more likely it becomes that immigrants will assimilate in ways that are actually harmful to their heart health, writes
Cells to Society
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There’s little question about the need of more diversity in the nursing workforce to match that found increasingly among patient populations. But how do you build a nursing education environment that will attract such diversity? For starters, stop using all-white manikin “patients” for simulation training, according to former faculty member Cynthia L. Foronda, PhD, RN,
Cells to Society
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CELLS TO SOCIETY — LEADING THE SCIENCE OF NURSING A Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Publication View research news from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. In this Issue: Women's Health Administration Cardiovascular Care Critical Care Education Family And more ADMINISTRATION Is There a Relationship Between Night Shift and Errors? What Nurse Leaders Need to
Cells to Society
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VIOLENCE Interactive Training Improves Workplace Climate, Knowledge, and Support Toward Domestic Violence American Journal of Industrial Medicine NANCY GLASS* & COLLEAGUES Elements of Effective Interventions for Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Latina Women: A Systematic Review Plos One  CARMEN ALVAREZ*, PATRICIA DAVIDSON, CHRISTINA FLEMING & NANCY GLASS Cumulative Violence Exposures: Black Women’s Responses and Sources
Cells to Society
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Results of a Johns Hopkins School of Nursing-led study on intimate partner violence show that pregnant victims saw a significant reduction in exposure to such acts after participating in the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE). The brochure-based empowerment intervention was developed by Phyllis Sharps, PhD, RN, FAAN, associate dean for community programs and
Cells to Society
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Though they may adapt physically to being tethered to a life-saving heart pump, patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) may need additional care in coping emotionally. These challenges must be honestly addressed, according to “Adaptation and Coping in Patients Living with an LVAD: A metasynthesis,” by PhD candidates Martha Abshire, MS, RN, and Mia
Cells to Society
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Neighborhood impacts risk for older whites but not for blacks Black older adults face higher odds of hypertension than white older adults whether they live in predominantly white, black, or mixed-race neighborhoods, and whether those places are impoverished or better off financially. White older adults’ hypertension risks, on the other hand, are far more dependent
Cells to Society
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SEPTEMBER 2015 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE “Burnout and Resilience Among Nurses Practicing in High-Intensity Settings” CYNDA RUSHTON* & COLLEAGUES APRIL 2016 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH “Effects of Community-Based Health Worker Interventions to Improve Chronic Disease Management and Care Among Vulnerable Populations: A Systematic Review” Laura Gitlin, Hae-Ra Han & colleagues MAY 2016 American Society on
Cells to Society
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Over 2 million children in the U.S. have at least one parent in the military. Such families have long been known to carry additional burdens, including frequent moves and changing schools, and this is particularly the case when a parent has been absent from home during a lengthy deployment. Jennifer Trautmann, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, a
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